Best Houseparty Denies A Hack And Assures That It Is A Smear Campaign

Houseparty Denies A Hack The company offers a million dollars to anyone who can prove that the rumors stem from a paid and targeted campaign.

Houseparty Denies A Hack And Assures That It Is A Smear Campaign
Houseparty Denies A Hack And Assures That It Is A Smear Campaign

Houseparty, one of the applications for making video calls most used in these times of quarantine, has denied on their social networks that they suffered a hack. The company has done this after complaints began to emerge from users who claimed to have received charges in their bank accounts and emails warning of access to the account of services such as Spotify.

“All Houseparty accounts are safe: the service is secure, has never been compromised, and does not store passwords for other pages,” the company said on Twitter. This last point, by the way, is not a guarantee of security, since another service can be compromised if it uses the same password as an application that has suffered an attack or if it has been given permissions to access the first one.

Houseparty does not access many of the services that users claimed to have lost control on Twitter, such as Netflix or Spotify, although it does connect to the Facebook account, which in many cases is linked to the previous ones (and, again , it can be dangerous if the password is shared).

Why Nobody Is Talking About Houseparty Denies A Hack And Assures That It Is A Smear Campaign And What You Should Do Today

In any case, the company (which is owned by Epic Games, the creators of Fortnite) are convinced that the rumors were spread “by a paid smear campaign” that wants to damage the reputation of their service. So much so that they offer a reward of a million dollars to the first person capable of providing proof of this directed action.

Previously, the service received criticism for allowing contacts common to any participant of a video call to enter these when they are not marked as private.

The best recommendation in this case is not so much to delete the application (which can also be done), as suggested by several people, but to change any password that is shared with another service for a different and secure one. Also, it does not hurt to check which applications have permissions on Facebook, something that can be done at this link.

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